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31st International Conference on Materials Chemistry and Science, will be organized around the theme “Extending the exploration potentials in the field of materials science”

MCS 2019 is comprised of keynote and speakers sessions on latest cutting edge research designed to offer comprehensive global discussions that address current issues in MCS 2019

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Predicting and characterizing structure in 4D – from the nanoscale to the mesoscale and over time scales ranging from picoseconds to years – will be crucial for speedy deployment of new materials into advanced engineering systems. Concerned materials systems incorporate amorphous alloys, advanced metallics, ceramics, and nanocrystalline materials, with an emphasis on the role of defects and interfaces.

  • Track 1-1Microstructure/property relationships in three-dimensionally braided composites
  • Track 1-2Innovative instrumentation for 3D tomography
  • Track 1-3New in-situ testing approaches
  • Track 1-43D Printing Materials
  • Track 1-5Challenges in 3D Materials Science

An alloy is a combination of metals or of a metal and another element. Alloys are defined by a metallic bonding character. An alloy may be a solid solution of metal elements (a single phase) or a mixture of metallic phases (two or more solutions). Intermetallic compounds are alloys with a defined stoichiometry and crystal structure. Zintl phases are also sometimes considered alloys depending on bond types (see also: Van Arkel–Ketelaar triangle for information on classifying bonding in binary compounds). Current alloy design strategies for improving the ductility of ultra-high strength alloys mainly focus on the selection of alloy composition (atomic length scale)

  • Track 2-1Chemical elements
  • Track 2-2Stainless steel
  • Track 2-3Heat-treatable alloys
  • Track 2-4Interstitial alloys
  • Track 2-5Amalgams

Antimicrobial polymers, also known as polymeric biocides, are a class of polymers with antimicrobial activity, or the ability to inhibit the growth of microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi or protozoans. These polymers have been engineered to mimic antimicrobial peptides which are used by the immune systems of living things to kill bacteria. Typically, antimicrobial polymers are produced by attaching or inserting an active antimicrobial agent onto a polymer backbone via an alkyl or acetyl linker. Antimicrobial polymers may enhance the efficiency and selectivity of currently used antimicrobial agents while decreasing associated environmental hazards because antimicrobial polymers are generally non-volatile and chemically stable.

  • Track 3-1Antimicrobial Monomers
  • Track 3-2Applications of Polymers
  • Track 3-3Antimicrobial Activity
  • Track 3-4Synthetic Methods
  • Track 3-5Counter Ion
Asymmetric catalysis is a type of catalysis in which a chiral catalyst directs the formation of a chiral compound such that the formation of one particular stereoisomer is favored. Since the catalyst is not consumed in this process it may be used in a substoichiometric quantity – potentially improving efficiency and avoiding waste.
 
Organoboron compounds are chemical compounds of boron and carbon that are organic derivatives of BH3, for example, trialkyl boranes. Organoboron chemistry or organoborane chemistry is the chemistry of these compounds. Organoboron compounds are important reagents in organic chemistry enabling many chemical transformations, the most important one called hydroboration.
  • Track 4-1Synthesis from Grignard reagents
  • Track 4-2Carboranes
  • Track 4-3Design of catalysts for site-selective and enantioselective functionalization of non-activated primary C–H bonds
  • Track 4-4Enantioselective dearomative prenylation of indole derivatives
  • Track 4-5Borates
A flow battery may be used like a fuel cell (where the spent fuel is extracted and new fuel is added to the system) or like a rechargeable battery (where an electric power source drives the regeneration of the fuel). While it has technical advantages over conventional rechargeables, such as potentially separable liquid tanks and near unlimited longevity, current implementations are comparatively less powerful and require more sophisticated electronics. The hybrid flow battery uses one or more electroactive components deposited as a solid layer. In this case, the electrochemical cell contains one battery electrode and one fuel cell electrode. This type is limited in energy by the surface area of the electrode. Hybrid flow batteries include the zinc-bromine, zinc–cerium, lead–acid, and iron-salt flow batteries.
  • Track 5-1Flow battery
  • Track 5-2Rechargeable battery
  • Track 5-3UltraBattery
  • Track 5-4Biofuels
  • Track 5-5Hydrated salts
A biomaterial is any substance that has been engineered to interact with biological systems for a medical purpose - either a therapeutic (treat, augment, repair or replace a tissue function of the body) or a diagnostic one. As a science, biomaterials is about fifty years old. The study of biomaterials is called biomaterials science or biomaterials engineering. It has experienced steady and strong growth over its history, with many companies investing large amounts of money into the development of new products. Biomaterials science encompasses elements of medicine, biology, chemistry, tissue engineering, and materials science.
  • Track 6-1Biopolymers
  • Track 6-2Bioactivity
  • Track 6-3Geistlich biomaterials
  • Track 6-4Collagen matrices
  • Track 6-5 Compatibility
Living organisms have evolved well-adapted structures and materials over geological time through natural selection. Biomimetics has given rise to new technologies inspired by biological solutions at macro and nanoscales. Humans have looked at nature for answers to problems throughout our existence. Nature has solved engineering problems such as self-healing abilities, environmental exposure tolerance and resistance, hydrophobicity, self-assembly, and harnessing solar energy.
  • Track 7-1Construction and architecture
  • Track 7-2Structural materials
  • Track 7-3Self-healing materials
  • Track 7-4Surfaces
  • Track 7-5Adhesion
Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are allotropes of carbon with a cylindrical nanostructure. These cylindrical carbon molecules have unusual properties, which are valuable for nanotechnology, electronics, optics and other fields of materials science and technology. Owing to the material's exceptional strength and stiffness, nanotubes have been constructed with length-to-diameter ratio of up to 132,000,000:1, significantly larger than for any other material.
 
Graphene is a semimetal with a small overlap between the valence and the conduction bands (zero bandgap material). It is an allotrope (form) of carbon consisting of a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice. It is the basic structural element of many other allotropes of carbon, such as graphite, diamond, charcoal, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes.
  • Track 8-1Amorphous Semiconductors
  • Track 8-2Silicon and Germanium
  • Track 8-3Organic semiconductors
  • Track 8-4Hydrogenated Amorphous
  • Track 8-5Semiconductor characterization techniques

A substance which provides a mechanism with a higher activation energy does not increase the rate because the reaction can still occur by the non-catalyzed route. An added substance which does increase the reaction rate is not considered a catalyst but a reaction inhibitor. Catalysts may be classified as either homogeneous or heterogeneous. A homogeneous catalyst is one whose molecules are dispersed in the same phase (usually gaseous or liquid) as the reactant's molecules. A heterogeneous catalyst is one whose molecules are not in the same phase as the reactant's, which are typically gases or liquids that are adsorbed onto the surface of the solid catalyst. Enzymes and other biocatalysts are often considered as a third category.

  • Track 9-1Electrocatalysts
  • Track 9-2Organocatalysis
  • Track 9-3Enzymes and biocatalysts
  • Track 9-4Nanocatalysts
  • Track 9-5Tandem catalysis
Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are allotropes of carbon with a cylindrical nanostructure. These cylindrical carbon molecules have unusual properties, which are valuable for nanotechnology, electronics, optics and other fields of materials science and technology. Owing to the material's exceptional strength and stiffness, nanotubes have been constructed with length-to-diameter ratio of up to 132,000,000:1, significantly larger than for any other material.
 
Graphene is a semimetal with a small overlap between the valence and the conduction bands (zero bandgap material). It is an allotrope (form) of carbon consisting of a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice. It is the basic structural element of many other allotropes of carbon, such as graphite, diamond, charcoal, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes.
  • Track 10-1Inorganic nanotube
  • Track 10-2Single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs)
  • Track 10-3Multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs).
  • Track 10-4Graphene supercapacitors
  • Track 10-5Graphene applications as optical lenses

A major consideration for most coating processes is that the coating is to be applied at a controlled thickness, and a number of different processes are in use to achieve this control, ranging from a simple brush for painting a wall, to some very expensive machinery applying coatings in the electronics industry. A further consideration for 'non-all-over' coatings is that control is needed as to where the coating is to be applied. A number of these non-all-over coating processes are printing processes.

  • Track 11-1Spray
  • Track 11-2Vapor deposition
  • Track 11-3coating processes
  • Track 11-4Physical coating
  • Track 11-5Insulation

A composite material (also called a composition material or shortened to composite, which is the common name) is a material made from two or more constituent materials with significantly different physical or chemical properties that, when combined, produce a material with characteristics different from the individual components. The individual components remain separate and distinct within the finished structure, differentiating composites from mixtures and solid solutions.

  • Track 12-1Fiber
  • Track 12-2Fabrication methods
  • Track 12-3Ceramic matrix composites
  • Track 12-4High strain composites
  • Track 12-5Glass-reinforced plastic

Computational modeling is the use of computers to simulate and study the behavior of complex systems using mathematics, physics and computer science. A computational model contains numerous variables that characterize the system being studied. Simulation is done by adjusting each of these variables alone or in combination and observing how the changes affect the outcomes. The results of model simulations help researchers make predictions about what will happen in the real system that is being studied in response to changing conditions. Modeling can expedite research by allowing scientists to conduct thousands of simulated experiments by a computer in order to identify the actual physical experiments that are most likely to help the researcher find the solution to the problem being studied. 

  • Track 13-1Materials Synthesis
  • Track 13-2Characterization and Defect Structure
  • Track 13-3Electronic Materials
  • Track 13-4Nuclear Materials
  • Track 13-5Structural Materials

In the most common use of the word, this means electrochemical oxidation of metal in reaction with an oxidant such as oxygen or sulfates. Rusting, the formation of iron oxides, is a well-known example of electrochemical corrosion. This type of damage typically produces oxide(s) or salt(s) of the original metal, and results in a distinctive orange colouration. Corrosion can also occur in materials other than metals, such as ceramics or polymers, although in this context, the term "degradation" is more common. Corrosion degrades the useful properties of materials and structures including strength, appearance and permeability to liquids and gases.

  • Track 14-1Corrosion in passivated materials
  • Track 14-2Surface treatments
  • Track 14-3Corrosion in nonmetals
  • Track 14-4Cathodic protection
  • Track 14-5Microbial corrosion

Damage tolerance is a property of a structure relating to its ability to sustain defects safely until repair can be effected. The approach to engineering design to account for damage tolerance is based on the assumption that flaws can exist in any structure and such flaws propagate with usage. This approach is commonly used in aerospace engineering to manage the extension of cracks in structure through the application of the principles of fracture mechanics. In aerospace engineering, structure is considered to be damage tolerant if a maintenance program has been implemented that will result in the detection and repair of accidental damage, corrosion and fatigue cracking before such damage reduces the residual strength of the structure below an acceptable limit. As one such approach to crack repair, the placement of a hole at a crack tip to reduce stress concentration and inhibit crack propagation is widely studied and implemented.

  • Track 15-1Ceramic reinforcements for composites
  • Track 15-2Safe-life structure and failure mitigation
  • Track 15-3Fracture modes & mechanics
  • Track 15-4In marine composites
  • Track 15-5Non-destructive testing

Electrocatalysis results in the modification of the rate of an electrochemical reaction occurring on an electrode surface. The relative electrocatalytic properties of a group of materials at a given temperature and concentration are not necessarily constant and may vary according to the different dependence of rates on electrical potential.

  • Track 16-1Artificial intelligence in catalysis
  • Track 16-2Fuel Cells
  • Track 16-3Electrochemical synthesis of hydrocarbons
  • Track 16-4Electrocatalytic ammonia

Electronic properties of a material are governed by the response of electrons and other charged entities to the external stimulus such as electrical potential difference and its variation, incident electromagnetic radiation, magnetic field, heat, mechanical forces etc. The response to the external stimulus is strongly correlated with the internal structure of the material at different length-scales, chemical composition, both intrinsic and extrinsic defects, as well as dimensionality (zero, one, two or three dimensional) of the material. The field of Science and Technology of Electronic Materials involve understanding these correlations, as well as the development of technologies for the synthesis/fabrication of materials with desired electronic properties. .Optoelectronics is built based on the quantum mechanical effects of light on electronic materials, sometimes in the presence of electric fields, especially semiconductors. Optoelectronic technologies comprise of laser systems, remote sensing systems, fiber optic communications, optical information systems, and electric eyes medical diagnostic systems.

  • Track 17-1Photonics Materials
  • Track 17-2Lasers and Optical Fibers
  • Track 17-3Sensors and Actuators

In Energy harvesting process (also known as power harvesting or energy scavenging or ambient power) energy is derived from external sources (e.g., solar power, thermal energy, wind energy, salinity gradients, and kinetic energy, also known as ambient energy), captured, and stored for small, wireless autonomous devices, like those used in wearable electronics and wireless sensor networks. Energy harvesters provide a very small amount of power for low-energy electronics. While the input fuel to some large-scale generation costs resources (oil, coal, etc.), the energy source for energy harvesters is present as ambient background. For example, temperature gradients exist from the operation of a combustion engine and in urban areas, there is a large amount of electromagnetic energy in the environment because of radio and television broadcasting.

  • Track 18-1Smart transportation intelligent system
  • Track 18-2Pyroelectric
  • Track 18-3Thermoelectrics
  • Track 18-4Electrostatic (capacitive)
  • Track 18-5Magnetic induction